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Natural Industries breaks ground on new facility

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Building will include a state-of-the-art research laboratory

| August 9, 2011

Natural Industries, which manufactures organic products such as Actinovate and Actino-Iron that use patented microbes to protect plants from fungal diseases, has broken ground on a new 20,000 square-foot facility in an office park setting on the north side of Houston that will include a 5,000 square-foot state-of-the-art research laboratory. The facility is expected to be completed later this year.

“With increasing global demand for our patented microbial products, we have outgrown our lab space,” said Boomer Cardinale, marketing director for Natural Industries. “Our growth has also resulted in a doubling of our staff in just the past year."

Natural Industries’ patented microbes are currently found in products used by thousands of horticulture, agriculture and landscape professionals around the world. After years of use by commercial operations, Natural Industries made its microbe-based products available to the consumer lawn and garden market.

For more information about the company and its products, visit www.naturalindustries.com.

Photo:
A conceptual rendering shows the new Natural Industries building, which is expected to be completed in late 2011.

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