From the Inside Out: Divide and conquer

Departments - From the Inside Out

Distribute responsibilities fairly so that your best employees aren’t overburdened.

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February 24, 2015

The world is full of two types of employees: those who get things done early and those who put things off until the last minute. Those who get things done early prefer structure, deadlines and plenty of breathing room to finish assignments. Those who procrastinate prefer freedom in how and when they approach tasks, to gather as much information as possible, and the adrenaline that accompanies an approaching deadline.

Managing those who get things done early is a dream. You give them a job and it gets completed in a timely manner. Unfortunately, the strain is transferred to employees who can’t bear to have unfinished projects, and who run themselves ragged to finish jobs only to be assigned additional tasks.

“If you want something done, give it to a busy person,” is the mantra of most business owners and managers. Wonderful for the business and the manager, but not so great for the dependable employee burdened with one more task. In addition to not being fun or fair, it’s demotivating to be repeatedly asked to pick up other people’s slack.

What your persistent, getter-done-or-die-trying employees desperately need is protection from you, other employees and even themselves. As a wise leader, knowing they will sacrifice and suffer rather than be late or fail to follow through, you’ll want to keep tabs on their workload and how they are holding up.

High performers who keep getting additional jobs are at huge risk for burnout. Once that happens, they either quit and find a different job, or they will take their heart out of the workplace. At a bare minimum they’ll start doing “an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay,”nothing more. Divide up assignments and watch your rock stars and Steady Eddies soar.

I can almost hear you panic at the thought of spreading out the workload, particularly to employees who procrastinate, turn things in late and always have a good excuse. While panic isn’t necessary, you will need to manage and train your Last Minute Lucys and Larrys to meet deadlines.

While they might not like it, procrastinators need you to set and hold appropriate deadlines and work boundaries. Without them, they will drop the ball and needlessly cause extreme frustration and stress.

It’s helpful to understand that procrastinators actually need the adrenaline that accompanies a deadline. Deadlines propel them to work smarter, faster and more effectively. Deadlines kick in their creative juices. Working on deadline is their preferred and most effective work mode.

Here are seven tips for bringing out the best in your procrastination-prone employees:

  • Set clear deadlines.
  • Ask for their commitment to meet the deadline.
  • Ask when they would like for you to check their progress.
  • With clearly outlined expectations, allow great freedom to determine how and when they approach the task.
  • Refrain from doing it yourself or reassigning a task before the deadline.
  • Hold them accountable for missing deadlines by letting them know the physical, financial and emotional cost of their actions. If this doesn’t bring about desired results, set consequences. No matter how brilliant or charming, if they can’t meet deadlines, they aren’t a good fit for your company.
  • Lastly, recognize the immeasurable gift they bring your company by being able to nimbly respond to anything that gets thrown at them. You need and want them on your team.
     

While boundaries and deadlines are your best friends as a manager, remember to refrain from rewarding your persistent rock stars with yet another job. Effectively manage both types of employees and you’ll set yourself and everyone else up for long-term success.

 


Human relations expert Dr. Sherene McHenry works with organizations that want to maximize productivity and enhance profitability. To learn more visit www.sherenemchenry.com.